The Great Gatsby

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Answered Questions (66)

Christine I do not think that 'transgender' is exactly the word you mean. I am pretty sure Nick identifies as a man, and he has not undergone any hormone…moreI do not think that 'transgender' is exactly the word you mean. I am pretty sure Nick identifies as a man, and he has not undergone any hormone treatments is 1922!! However -- I would say there is definite evidence that Nick has homo-erotic tendencies and most likely is in love with Gatsby.

I had read the novel twice and I never thought this before. But upon my 3rd read I discovered some passages that indicate Nick's homosexual tendencies. Namely -- Nick accompanies Mr. McKee home after a night of hard drinking and possibly ends up in his bed (p. 38). There are attractive women at the party, Nick has been paired off with Catherine, yet he leaves her and follows Mr. McKee, a total stranger, all the way home! In another incident, Nick is riding the train and he fantasizes about kissing the male conductor (p. 115). In another passage, Nick laments turning thirty and the fact that his list of 'single men' is dwindling (p. 135). These incidents are coupled with the fact that Nick repeatedly turns down offers from women, including Jordan Baker, girls from his home town and office romances. Nothing ever develops between Nick and any women, nor does he express desire for them. In such a beautifully written novel, Nick's attraction to any female would surely have been emphasized. But it is not. His infatuation for Gatsby is told many times and in great detail!

These clues are subtle, the kind of thing a reader might easily pass over. However, upon my 3rd read I must say the implications are definitely THERE.

It is a very layered and complicatetd novel. I believe Fitzgerald was attempting to encompass several sections of society. Why was he so vague? Remember, the novel was published in 1925, a time when people were jailed, beat up and killed for homosexuality.
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Chrissa I don't think so. There is this scene in chapter 6, and they're in the hotel, (Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Jordan and Nick) and Tom says "... and next they'll…moreI don't think so. There is this scene in chapter 6, and they're in the hotel, (Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Jordan and Nick) and Tom says "... and next they'll throw everything overboard and have intermarriage between black and white."
Whereupon Jordan says: "We're all white here."(less)
Chris Gatsby keeps Nick on his toes. I think Nick has always search for a companion, just as Gatsby has searched for a companion. They are two lonely…moreGatsby keeps Nick on his toes. I think Nick has always search for a companion, just as Gatsby has searched for a companion. They are two lonely individuals looking for a place in the world.(less)
Tommy By being vague it allows the reader to think of the book in their own way, rather then just telling you one thing, you can imagine it in a few ways.…moreBy being vague it allows the reader to think of the book in their own way, rather then just telling you one thing, you can imagine it in a few ways. At least that is what i think.(less)
Sarah Explicit adult themes are minimal if present at all, and the novel's location in the adult section may have more to do with the intended reader of…moreExplicit adult themes are minimal if present at all, and the novel's location in the adult section may have more to do with the intended reader of 'classic' literature as a more mature audience and the actual subject matter than as any warning to its content. As you correctly stated, this novel is generally read by high school students (14-18), but you should make a personal determination of maturity.(less)

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